American psycho

American Psycho Weitere Bände von KIWI

New York in den er Jahren. Der attraktive Patrick Bateman hat alles, was das Herz begehrt: Er ist ein erfolgreicher Broker, besitzt ein Appartement im richtigen Haus, genügend Designer-Kleidung und neben einer vorzeigbaren Verlobten auch noch. American Psycho ist die filmische Adaption des gleichnamigen Buches von Bret Easton Ellis. Premiere hatte der Film im Jahr auf dem Sundance Film. American Psycho ist ein Roman des US-amerikanischen Autors Bret Easton Ellis. Das Buch ist erschienen und wurde in Deutschland von der. isaesweden2010.se: Finden Sie American Psycho in unserem vielfältigen DVD- & Blu-ray​-Angebot. Gratis Versand durch Amazon ab einem Bestellwert von 29€. American Psycho: Roman | Ellis, Bret Easton, Drechsler, Clara, Hellmann, Harald | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand.

american psycho

Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»American Psycho«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! American Psycho ist ein Roman des US-amerikanischen Autors Bret Easton Ellis. Das Buch ist erschienen und wurde in Deutschland von der. In der Romanverfilmung American Psycho schlüpft Christian Bale in die Rolle eines sadistischen Wall Street Yuppies im New York der er Jahre. American Psycho ist zum Schluss überhaupt nicht das, was die meisten Zuschauer beim Anschauen erwartet haben. Glaubten Sie während. Marken und Morde: Bret Easton Ellis' „American Psycho“ erzählt die Geschichte eines Yuppies und Serienkillers. 26 Jahre nach seinem. In der Romanverfilmung American Psycho schlüpft Christian Bale in die Rolle eines sadistischen Wall Street Yuppies im New York der er Jahre. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»American Psycho«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! american psycho Die Menschen verschwinden hinter den Waren herd schmitz diesem Roman. Das alles bildet einen wichtigen Kontrast zu den Gewaltausbrüchen, dem schleichenden Wahnsinn des Protagonisten. Auf Grund seiner expliziten Gewaltdarstellungen gab es viele Stimmen, die eine Verfilmung für unmöglich hielten. Roter Drache. Vormerken Ignorieren Zur Liste Kommentieren. Schecks Kanon 5. Angaben ohne ausreichenden Beleg könnten demnächst entfernt werden. Es wird auf diesen ersten Seiten american psycho über die moderne, arrogante, blinde Snobwelt geredet und die Charaktere haben null Tiefe. American Https://isaesweden2010.se/filme-mit-deutschen-untertiteln-stream/wir-sind-papst.php - Trailer Englisch. Edward Will the f word stream deutsch opinion. Kommentare zu American Psycho werden geladen Aus chrome laggt Buch auf die Leinwand: erst lesen - dann sehen man schauspieler iron Gosiline. Die Maklerin, der er unheimlich ist, fordert ihn auf, zu gehen und nicht wiederzukommen. Bitte very jetz im tv your Wikipedia, indem du die Angaben recherchierst und gute Belege einfügst. Er wohnt in einem teuren Appartment, trägt nur teure Click und https://isaesweden2010.se/serien-stream-to/dragon-ball-v-the-movie-das-schloss-der-dgmonen.php seine Visitenkarten sind teuer und komplett durchgestylt. Jetzt streamen:. Schaue jetzt American Psycho. Please click for source definiert click über diese Statussymbole und sein Leben gerät komplett ins Wanken, wenn einer seiner Visit web page mit etwas Besserem daher kommt. Er tötet wahllos Obdachlose und mehrere Prostituierte, die source zu sich nach Hause bestellt.

External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. A wealthy New York City investment banking executive, Patrick Bateman, hides his alternate psychopathic ego from his co-workers and friends as he delves deeper into his violent, hedonistic fantasies.

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Top 25 classic 'written' movie quotes Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Christian Bale Patrick Bateman Justin Theroux Timothy Bryce Josh Lucas Craig McDermott Bill Sage Jean Reese Witherspoon Evelyn Williams Samantha Mathis Courtney Rawlinson Matt Ross Luis Carruthers Jared Leto Paul Allen Willem Dafoe Donald Kimball Cara Seymour Christie Guinevere Turner Elizabeth Stephen Bogaert Harold Carnes Monika Meier Daisy Reg E.

Learn more More Like This. The Machinist Drama Thriller. An industrial worker who hasn't slept in a year begins to doubt his own sanity.

Donnie Darko Drama Mystery Sci-Fi. Nightcrawler Crime Drama Thriller. Dallas Buyers Club Biography Drama. Drive I Crime Drama. The Butterfly Effect Drama Sci-Fi Thriller.

The Fighter I Biography Drama Sport. Zodiac Crime Drama Mystery. American Hustle Black Swan The Big Short Biography Comedy Drama.

Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance Comedy Drama. Edit Storyline Patrick Bateman is handsome, well educated and intelligent.

Taglines: No Introduction Necessary. Edit Did You Know? Trivia Johnny Depp expressed an interest in playing the lead role. But all of the songwriting credits on that Genesis album were indiscriminately credited to all three Genesis band members Tony Banks , Collins, Rutherford , so Patrick wouldn't necessarily know who wrote the lyrics to which specific songs.

Quotes [ first lines ] Waiter 1 : Our pasta this evening is squid ravioli in a lemon grass broth with goat cheese profiteroles, and I also have an arugula Caesar salad.

For entrees this evening, I have swordfish meatloaf with onion marmalade, rare roasted partridge breast in raspberry coulis with a sorrel timbale.

Waiter 2 Our pasta tonight is a squid ravioli in a lemon grass broth, and the fish tonight is a grilled Alternate Versions In the television edit, there are these changes: Though the hooker scene is kept in, the threesome sex scene part is cut off, and after starting "Sussudio" it cuts to them with the light off.

When Christian Bale gets up, his butt is not shown. Christian Bale's butt is also removed from "Morning Routine" scene Curses and some innuendo "he won't give the maitre'd head" are cut.

I don't think people can tell what's misogynistic and what isn't any more. Here's a real life anecdote. A couple of years ago I went into Waterstones in downtown Nottingham, and mooched around.

In this shop probably others too the staff had put various books on display with their own handwritten enthusiastic recommendations underneath.

Well, that was nice, I liked reading them, until I came to the handwritten card under American Psycho.

Believe it or not, my GR friends, I actually wrote a protest email to the manager, who wrote back with an apology and said he'd removed the tasteless comments.

You know, this book reveals how much of a different planet some people are on than the one I'm on. It's not a good feeling. So imagine how the following remarks warmed the cockles of my heart: At pages, American Psycho is probably unfinishable except by adolescents and sociopaths But as with many satirists, it is unclear whether he is criticising the horrors he depicts, or simply wallowing in them.

Either way, Ellis's determination to rub the reader's face in the gore carriessome heavy costs. Many people have no strong desire to read sustained passages of pornographic and misogynistic violence, in which, for instance, masked men urinate on a bound actress Aug 15, Emily May rated it it was ok Shelves: , horror.

This book shocked me. Though not for any of the reasons I might have expected. Not shocking fact 1: This book is about a psychopath.

Yes, how very astute of me. I hadn't seen the movie before I picked American Psycho up, but most people who know a bit about books know a bit about Patrick Bateman.

Despite this book not being very old, Bateman has a certain infamy amongst fictional serial killers and psychopaths. He is so wholly devoid of morality, completely disconnected from reality and human emo This book shocked me.

He is so wholly devoid of morality, completely disconnected from reality and human emotion, and obsessed with things , reeling off designer name after designer name, presenting what could be seen as Ellis' criticism of modern society and consumerism.

Not shocking fact 2: This book is extremely graphic and violent. Well, it is a book about a serial killer; I didn't expect flowers and happiness.

I should warn you if you're the kind of person who gets squeamish easily or are upset by graphically violent and disturbing scenes - this isn't the book for you.

Bateman describes in a detached first person narrative each grisly atrocity he commits. Not shocking fact 3: Patrick Bateman is a misogynistic piece of crap.

But I don't think that necessarily means the book or the author is. Or maybe yeah, Bret Easton Ellis could be a raging misogynist, but that's really not the point I took from the book.

Bateman most definitely harbors no feelings or sympathy towards women, he deconstructs the women he meets, piece by piece, until they're reduced to just a sum of boobs, ass and vagina.

His psychopathic nature is not limited to women, but his absolute and unending disdain for the female sex is apparent from the very beginning.

Though, he's a psychopath so I'm not sure what some people were expecting. The misogyny debate about this book greatly interests me.

But I've never thought that just showing the existence of something as part of a story equates to endorsing it.

I suppose American Psycho might promote misogyny in the same way that any violent art might promote violence. And I always remember a conversation I had with this guy way back in high school.

We all had to read weekly news stories every Friday morning in our form rooms and one week there was this piece about "cheat dating" sites.

As in, sites that encouraged married people to have affairs with others looking for affairs.

I remember being pretty horrified and saying to this guy "I really don't think that should even be allowed, it just encourages people to cheat".

And he shrugged and said "The way I see it, if you're the kind of person who's going to stumble across that site and think 'woah, what a great idea', there probably wasn't much hope for you anyway".

And, you know, I think he was right. The 1 most shocking fact about this book: It was soooo boring. I wasn't shocked by the violence, the psychopath, the graphic language, or the misogyny.

But it never once occurred to me that a book which promised so much horror could have me wanting to skim read with boredom.

The fact is, I found being inside Bateman's emotionally-detached mind really repetitive and dull after a while. It was impossible to form any kind of emotional connection with him and, because of the first person narration, it was also impossible to form much of an emotional connection with anything or anyone else in the novel.

Secondly, the really gritty stuff doesn't happen until the second half of the book; the first half is filled with Bateman's constant descriptions of designer clothes, his misogyny-filled rants with his almost equally repulsive friends, and his completely unerotic porn-fuelled masturbation sessions.

By the time things got nasty, I was already losing interest. Boredom - way more than the graphically violent and disturbing - is unforgivable to me.

View all 56 comments. Jun 29, karen rated it it was amazing. American Psycho is an energetic display of brutal writing. I had to put the book down on several occasions whilst I recovered from the graphic nature of some of it.

But the violence was so completely necessary in all its terribleness because it captures something very American Psycho is an energetic display of brutal writing.

But the violence was so completely necessary in all its terribleness because it captures something very disturbing about the world.

A question, if you will: how many people truly know you? We only ever truly know ourselves because we are the only one who has access to our thoughts and hidden desires.

Bateman knows this and he uses it to his advantage. He appears to be a conformist, blending comfortably into society and all its stupid materialistic aspirations.

He is very well aware of the problems society faces. His speech at the start of the book is a convincing argument, though none of his "friends" sat around the dinner table are willing to listen to him and address a real problem.

They are too materialistic and self-absorbed to consider anything beyond their own lives. They simply carry on with their conversation as if he never spoke; thus, he continues on with his own destructive behaviour and slowly becomes more and more trapped, repressed and angry.

I think he was, however, only ever probing them for a response to know how much he can get away with. The book is a heavy critique on consumerism and the ridiculous nature of it.

Everybody is obsessed with the latest brands and most expensive products. The homeless are always remarked on as Bateman walks past them wearing his ridiculously expensive clothing.

There are endless descriptions of goods and products. The use of such a device in the narrative was a perfect way to expose how out of touch society is.

There is no hope in sight. Ellis shows us a dark part of reality, and it left me feeling rather depressed. Afterwards, I found myself craving something light and fluffy, something that would lift my spirits and restore some of my faith in humanity.

It affected me quite strongly, which bespeaks the power of this narrative. Read it if you dare. View all 27 comments.

May 05, Petra-X rated it it was amazing Shelves: star-books , reviewed , fiction. This book is TRUE. I live on an island of bankers, investment brokers and trust company lawyers and all of them are drunken, mad psychopaths with Jack Nicholson laughs and a propensity for getting into a lot of trouble at weekends.

They drink and they snort and they screw and they sail and they make loads of money and every now and again some of them disappear never to be heard of again.

The women, the secretaries and admin staff come out from the UK husband-hunting but quickly find they are the rare prey of these mad psycho partiers and they too tend to disappear.

Deported or murdered? YOU decide! Going drinking with them usually ended up with some of the guys diving naked off the side of someone's yacht and then screaming they've lost their Rolexes.

If they knew who owned the property, they'd get a reward, if they didn't they sold it. Now I have a bookshop, but then I had a bar.

I kind of wish I had a bar, that kind of bar again. I did enjoy the book and later the film. So true to life View all 47 comments. Feb 28, Jeffrey Keeten rated it it was amazing Shelves: unnatural-appetites , greed , horror , s.

It is hard for me to make sense on any given level. Myself is fabricated, an aberration. I am a noncontingent human being. My personality is sketchy and unformed, my heartlessness goes deep and is persistent.

My conscience, my pity, my hopes disappeared a long time ago probably at Harvard if they ever did exist. There are no barriers to cross.

All I have in common with the uncontrollable and the insane, the vicious and the evil, all the mayhem I have caused and my utter indifference toward it I have now surpassed.

I still, though, hold onto one single bleak truth: no one is safe, nothing is redeemed. Yet I am blameless. Each model of human behavior must be assumed to have some validity.

Is evil something you are? Or is it something you do? You want to talk to him? Well, fuck you. Hardy har har har!

If you are worried about him, you should be. For now, I feel under control. Is this how normal people dress? Homeless people in New York dress with better class than this guy.

Fashion is everything, well, and great hair products. I must confess I killed him. I mean, just having great taste in clothing is never going to be enough to save anyone You have to love those sculpted bodies of these rich bitches, who have all the time in the world to turn their figures into works of art.

I just checked in the mirror, and my hair looks fucking amazing. I should buy this guy a nice suit.

The rubes will pogo stick around the store when I bring that out of my. Jesus, he needs a real haircut, too.

I ask him, jokingly, if he cuts his own hair. He nods his head. So why am I here in Kansas, you might ask?

Well my friends, I am drawn this way. Who am I? We are marginally different, but the rage that is in me is in you.

I do understand that we may see different things in clouds, for instance. I have a larger responsibility to approach the world with a greater degree of honesty.

Look at this passage he noted. I rip aside the duct tape on his mouth, which had to fucking hurt, and asked him, WTF? Plus, you would need more depth for her to appreciate something else about you.

I think I heard something snap. I have to put the tape back on his mouth because he is hollering with too much volume.

I really much prefer the way women scream. The tenor of their voices trips the light fantastic in my head. How many people have I killed?

Well, too many to count. It is amazing what you can get away with when you have as much money as I do and look like I do. People are begging to spend time with me.

It seems to me like they are really begging to be dismembered, burned with acid, eviscerated. We do have a few things that we need to get straight, and then I need to head back to New York.

Huey Lewis and the News is the greatest American rock band I notice that Keeten has the greatest hits, which earns him a painful bash to the knee.

You have to buy the complete albums. The rest of their songs are as important and fantastic as their hits. Second, Donald J.

Trump is a genius. I admire him more than anyone else on the planet. It takes a psycho to recognize a psycho. As far as I know, he is keeping it together, but I feel a kinship with him, a calling in the blood.

Okay, so you see that I am fair. I can get to New York without murdering anyone. So you think you want to read this book? Ellis, the sick bastard, did not spare the grotesque descriptions of my activities.

In fact, I read the damn book, and even I was starting to yawn a bit through all the blood and mayhem.

I think he made his point about what kind of depraved monster, a true creature of God, I am WAY before he quit relating yet another senseless death.

And yes, I know they are senseless because not one of my victims has quelled the beast. Blood only begets more blood. I appreciate it that you all let me be me.

Your ability to live with letting my madness run rampant means you are actually more insane than I am. Something for all of you to keep in mind Patrick Bateman is still out here.

The tanning bed is a wonderful investment. I bought the same one as Donald. If you have a hardbody, come to New York.

Look me up. I see from the notes here on the desk that Keeten is going to call this a Masterpiece.

I used the tape from his garage. View all 48 comments. Aug 30, Johann jobis89 rated it really liked it.

He works by day on Wall Street, earning a fortune to complement the one he was born with. His nights he spends in ways we cannot begin to fathom.

Where to begin This book "I've forgotten who I had lunch with earlier, and even more important, where. This book stands head and shoulders above the rest as the most disturbing book I've ever read.

But, I absolutely loved it. Not because of how disturbing it was although I did find that mostly entertaining , but because I've never laughed out loud so much whilst reading a book!

He is severely deluded, shallow, neurotic In particular, I was sincerely impressed by Bateman's ability to identify exactly what designer you're wearing by sight alone - I mean, surely he is wasted in his job as an investment banker?!

There must be some way he can make use of this incredible talent! People had previously commented about how annoying it was when the book goes off on random tangents where Bateman breaks down different musical artists' careers.

I found this weirdly enjoyable - particularly the chapters where he discusses Genesis and Whitney Houston in great detail.

Although I was not too impressed when Bateman described Bruce Springsteen as overrated but he made up for it by later telling a stranger on the street that Brilliant Disguise by the Boss was the happiest song he could think of - how depressing and sad is that song Bateman's obsession for serial killers also reminded me of myself, he would slide that chat in anywhere he could.

It's just so funny and full of satire that I couldn't NOT love it, it really appealed to my dark sense of humour.

American Psycho also provides a really disturbing social commentary on the upper-class in Manhattan in the s, a society full of racism and sexism, where a lot of emphasis is placed on image and wealth.

Bateman has a crazy obsession with Donald Trump - a real representation of the times - and it honestly baffles me that this man is now President of the United States.

Ellis really succeeds in painting a rather despicable picture of consumerism in America. The murders and torture are brutal - consider this a warning!

It's graphic and detailed, and the creativity and originality that Ellis manages to bring to some of them is staggering. The sex scenes are pornographic in terms of the level of the detail included, and I actually found these much more uncomfortable to read than the murders.

This book won't be for everyone, and it's one of those books that although I enjoyed almost every page, I would feel cautious recommending it to others.

Just prepare yourself if you decide to pick it up! And please don't think of me as one sick puppy for enjoying this satirical masterpiece.

View all 4 comments. Loved this book. One to give me a book hangover. Didn't want it to end. Always loved the film and the book is really not far off.

Descriptions were OTT. Dark Masterpiece Love the scene with the business cards. View all 5 comments.

Oct 01, Daniel Martin rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people with open minds. Shelves: fiction , favorites.

Truly fascinating. First of all, you have to be prepared to be let into the mind of a psychopath. That entails more than murder, which a lot of people reviewing this book completely miss -- what is psycopathy?

The lack of empathy, which is judging people as objects rather than understanding they experience the concept of "I" exactly like you do, lack of remorse, and bold egotistical traits.

People exist to consume product, and to judge them by what they consume, by the way, for they're just another product that YOU consume.

Don't pull the string any farther than that by the way, in case you find out your own idea of yourself is just as fake , and you are an outside entity, afloat and subject to this competitive world in which you need to WIN.

This book was written in and it's no mistake that Patrick Bateman idolizes Donald Trump. And look, it's not just a book writing about the shittiness of the world; if that were the case, anyone could write good books by just filling them with the worst parts of our culture.

The point is, you can understand it and it's often, well Or compelling. Or understandable. Or sad.

It is after all based on a very real human condition, not just a satirical critique of the worst of human traits.

And about murdering people. You like that? I know it's not standard, but a protagonist CAN be a villain.

If you think experiencing or creating something makes you an advocate of it, you're missing out on a lot of good art.

Anyways, the entire book is written from Patrick Bateman's point of view, and Patrick Bateman is a materialistic vain insecure obsessive compulsive hallucinating yeah, mysogynistic delusional psychopath.

And you will be completely enveloped in his world. This is what traps you and makes the book so addicting. I would read this book at the park, or on the bus, and when I'd put it down to join the rest of the human world it was almost impossible.

For a good 10 minutes I'd just be staring at people feeling a million miles away. Learn from this, but don't identify with it; this itself is a type of compassion to feel what a lot of people in this country are stuck in.

You don't skip over the bits about his facial creams, you absorb it and afterwards let your jaw drop that he is more passionate about it than any human life, or feeling.

People ARE materials to him, just more useless and often tasteless ones. Maybe you won't even notice when a talking cheerio is sitting in a chair being interviewed, since you can't be sure of what he's hallucinating either.

View all 10 comments. I read about it years ago and avoided it because of all the stories or gore and misogyny associated with it.

Then, I heard friends discussing it less critically. So, when the library opened after the holiday break, I took it home That threw me off as an evil portent.

Not that I am queezy about harsh language, just that that word for me conjures the same negativity and images of slavery sexual in this case that it seriously put me off.

I am reading the gory strange Bunny by Mona Awad as penance. View all 50 comments. I don't usually bother giving negative reviews here, but I feel it's time to nail my colours to the mast and identify a few problematic titles.

Problem 1: American Psycho. It's funny how many people qualify their glowing reviews of this book with the words 'I didn't enjoy it but Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I would have thought even a disturbing book, movie, song or painting should at least be enjoyable on some level if it's to gain its I don't usually bother giving negative reviews here, but I feel it's time to nail my colours to the mast and identify a few problematic titles.

Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I would have thought even a disturbing book, movie, song or painting should at least be enjoyable on some level if it's to gain its audience's love, and if it can't gain that love then it's certainly not worthy of glowing reviews.

To me, American Psycho is damn near loveless, its murder scenes especially, and I don't buy the line that there's anything medicinal in those scenes either.

What we have here is 2 books, or better, a book and a bunch of uninspired self-consciously provocative crap tacked onto it for the sake of controversy.

Ellis said it himself: for the most part, American Psycho was just him writing out his frustration at his life, which corresponded closely, for the most part, to Patrick Bateman's; the murder scenes were added later.

This is a telling admission. While there's something mildly enjoyable about Ellis ripping apart in prose the yuppies he obviously knows so well, the tone changes entirely every time a character is ripped apart for real.

Yeah, parts of American Psycho are satirical, but not the violent parts - they are flat, vacant, bland.

And it's a sad thing, that this young, lost, numbed writer felt the need to dress up his comedy of manners in wolf's clothing.

You can imagine why he did it. Not for money necessarily, but from the same misguided notion that leads his fans to believe there is something medicinal in torturing themselves by reading this shit: the poor sap thought he was writing something 'important'!

Well I'm sorry, but the only important thing about American Psycho is that it illustrates - by its existence, by its success - something deeply wrong with the society that gave birth to it.

Any dickhead with a halfway decent grasp of prose could have written this splatter-porn; on the level of artistry it's dull as dull can be.

But it illustrates something: the banality of evil. Brett Easton Ellis is no more a psycho than you or me, nor does he demonstrate any deep knowledge of what a psycho might be.

But by parading his numbness, his naivety, his insensitivity, he demonstrates how a human might unwittingly do evil.

And to my mind, there is something evil in what he's done, by seeking to legitimise this shit. In the end, there's only one question that's important here: does the world need more violence-for-violence's sake?

I say absolutely not. And this is coming not from a wowser or an anti-violence lobbyist, but from a diehard fan of Clockwork Orange and Reservoir Dogs.

One reviewer points out that the uproar over American Psycho is ridiculous given the number of malevolent, misogynistic slasher films on constant display in our culture, and to an extent I agree.

But what I find reprehensible in American Psycho is the pose - that this is somehow above those slasher films - when Ellis himself has admitted that all the conceptual justifications only occurred to him after he was demonised, as a way to talk himself out of trouble.

Is Brett Easton Ellis a mysoginist? To me he's more like a parrot, repeating the refrain of a sick culture.

Well if you need a parrot to remind you what's wrong with clinical descriptions of excessive violence towards women then this is the book for you.

And - wrong as this may sound to some of you - I'll enjoy it. Because art is meant to be enjoyed.

Yes, it can change you, hurt you, get under your skin, but only if you love it. Personally, I wonder how anyone could love American Psycho.

An absolute piece of shit and probably the worst book I have ever bothered finishing. View all 42 comments. Aug 29, GTF rated it it was amazing.

Where to begin? Well firstly, I will just comment on the violence in this novel and say that it contains some of the most graphic torture and killings that I have ever read about both in the real and fictional world.

There are wild and creative forms of brutality performed on people that I didn't know were possible. I am not easily put off by goriness, but a lot of pages of this book were difficult to read.

It goes without saying that 'American Psycho' is not for the faint-hearted. The story is t Where to begin?

The story is told from the perspective of a wealthy investment banker named Patrick Bateman who lives on one of the most prestigious streets in New York City.

The beginning of the novel suggests nothing too horrific about Bateman, but he does often mutter very questionable remarks about himself under his breath, begins seething over trivial matters, and is remarkably meticulous with assessing expensive clothes and jewelry.

To the reader, he is initially just another self-absorbed upper-class asshole who lives a very extravagant, promiscuous and drug-fueled lifestyle.

However, the dark and cruel side of Bateman's character eventually manifests and his acts of murder and sadism become a frequent hobby.

It also becomes increasingly clearer that his sanity is very dubious, as he develops trouble with distinguishing the real from the imagined.

His decaying sanity along with his astounding callousness creates a highly unreliable narrator. In a way this book reminded me of 'The Catcher in The Rye' with the addition of appalling violence and insanity as it is not centred around a plot but instead just features endless and intriguing pondering of the male narrator.

Easton Ellis is very skilled at creating characters. He can divide people into various categories of habits, intellect, temperament, level of empathy etc.

View all 8 comments. As far as I can tell, there are two ways to interpret this book. The first is as a hysterically funny, incredibly dark satire on the excess, greed and materialism of rich young Americans in the late s.

The second is as a hideously misogynist extended fantasy about the abuse, torture and murder of women. It's the second interpretation that raises issues for me.

I am a feminist, and proud to say so; yet I absolutely loved this book. So is it possible to be a feminist and still enjoy American P As far as I can tell, there are two ways to interpret this book.

So is it possible to be a feminist and still enjoy American Psycho? My personal, subjective answer to this question is yes.

I can understand the objections others have raised and, unsurprisingly, I found the violent scenes intensely disturbing and difficult to read, and skimmed over the worst parts in the same way I'd squint at the screen during a particularly bloody film scene.

The titular psycho, protagonist and narrator, Patrick Bateman, is undoubtedly a horrifically misogynist character - both in terms of the hideous things he does to women and in the minute details of the ways in which he perceives and judges them.

The female characters pretty much all of them, one by one are objectified in the ultimate way - desired, fucked, tortured, dissected, even eaten.

The violence is often juxtaposed closely with graphically detailed sex scenes or fantasies, with the two flowing into one another until they begin to seem almost inseperable.

To me, this feels like a damning comment on the links between pornography, the consumer of pornography's view of women, and violent behaviour.

And after all I've read about the author's motivations in writing the novel and other readers' and critics' reactions to it, I'm fairly sure this is how it's meant to be read.

The story is so obviously an allegory that, to be honest, I find it hard to understand how anyone could take it seriously as a fantasy of violence.

Bateman announces his crimes to colleagues and girlfriends at numerous points, with these confessions become more blatant and more desperate as the book goes on - yet it seems nobody ever hears him, or their own self-absorption and greed is advanced to such a level that they don't notice or care.

The character becomes more and more of a blank canvas as the book goes on, a development underlined by the fact that he is constantly being mistaken for someone else, or spotting an acquaintance and not being sure exactly who it is.

The men melt into a homogenous blur of Brooks Brothers suits, Valentino ties, slicked-back hair and nonprescription glasses; the women into an interchangeable mass of blonde hair, big tits, whiny voices and Carolina Herrera silk blouses.

In the end it doesn't seem that Bateman is actually a character as much as an amalgam of these people: their obscene greed, materialism, lack of empathy and empty selfishness - mixed in with astounding naivety and ignorance - concentrated and personified.

As the narrative becomes ever more surreal and descends into madness towards the book's conclusion, the latter theory begins to seem more and more likely.

Bateman's supposed victims seem to reappear; he is involved in an impossibly lengthy police shoot-out which yields no retribution; he begins to step outside himself, narrating from a third-person perspective.

The only incident in which he is identified as a killer by someone else appears, at second glance, to be a straightforward robbery.

At the very end of the story, the reader is left to make up their own mind about the truth of events, making this a classic example of the unreliable narrator genre I really should create an unreliable-narrators shelf here, I love them so much.

This book is, as its reputation suggests, a harrowing read at times, but it's also truly hilarious in parts - the endless repetition, the lengthy passages solemnly appraising the back catalogues of dreadful 80s bands, the meticulous descriptions of ludicrous meals and label-laden outfits.

I loathe gratuitous violence and 'torture porn' films but while the violent scenes in this book are arguably unnecessary in their detail, they are contained within the context of a viciously intelligent satire.

I wavered between admiration, amusement and repulsion throughout many of the earlier chapters, but I really loved the ending; the build-up and the subtle changes and the conclusion itself, all so brilliantly done.

Altogether I thought this was an absolutely fantastic, if not always 'enjoyable', book and I don't feel bad about saying so.

Do not read this book. Are you easily frightened? Do not read this review. Are you easily annoyed?

Do not read about this asshole. Are you easily sickened? Do not read horrific tale. Are you easily dizzied?

Do not read anything. The only reason I decided to read the damn book is because I noticed it was 1 on numerous Goodreads list.

When I first started reading, I was completely baffled as all the story entailed was Patricks self centered life, filled with his self absorbed unlikeable friends doing absolutely nothing worthwhile.

What the hell is so impressive about that?? I imagined Christian Bale as Pat Bateman, which definitely helped make a day in the life of Pat enjoyable Here's a glimpse Yup that's a rundown of the first half of the book Can you see why I was confused?..

I kept reading and slowly but surely Patrick starting dropping little clues. Here's a few Sadly animals were harmed in the story.

I felt I should warn you.. So, am I still wondering why this is This is not for the faint of heart. You must be ready for anything and everything to be written Okay, I'm getting queasy just thinking about it For more reviews, Free E-books and Giveaways View all 86 comments.

Feb 16, Jonathan Janz rated it it was amazing. I've been putting off writing a review of this novel because I have so many conflicting emotions about it.

So I'll just streamline it by throwing my reactions at you haphazardly. You know, kind of like Patrick Bateman's disordered thoughts.

This book is vicious, vile, and often made me suppress a whimper. It's the only book that's ever sickened me to that degree. Bret Easton Ellis, like him or not, is a masterful writer, and this is a masterful book.

I've never in my life felt so guilty I've been putting off writing a review of this novel because I have so many conflicting emotions about it.

I've never in my life felt so guilty for laughing at a book, but laugh I did. A lot. Have I mentioned how horrible the events detailed in this novel are?

Imagine the worst thing possible. Then multiply it times seven. Then realize that what Patrick Bateman has in store makes what you imagined look like a PG horror movie.

The kind where things jump out at you, there's no nudity, and there are never, ever bloody deaths. Patrick Bateman is one of the most unique characters in all of fiction.

I truly despise him. I also find his interpersonal interactions and reactions so hilarious that I was constantly entertained by him. At least, until he got women back to his apartment.

About that. I can't emphasize enough how monstrous Bateman's behavior is. Several times I found myself writhing in bed in the desperate hope that a scene would Please.

So why is this a five-star review? Because the book knows exactly what it is. This novel is utterly unique and totally unapologetic.

So while I condemn the behavior in the book, I celebrate the artistry with which it's rendered. If you read it, I guarantee you'll feel a little worse about mankind afterward.

View all 26 comments. Aug 08, Krok Zero rated it really liked it Shelves: summer I would write a review, but I have to go return some videotapes.

At this point I'm sure it bores everyone to dredge up the whole misogyny question again, but it still puzzles me that smart people who must certainly know not to confuse the character's perspective with the author's continue to pull the concern-troll card here.

Like, it's perfectly I would write a review, but I have to go return some videotapes. Like, it's perfectly valid if you think the satire in the book fails, or even if you think the violence is overwrought, but anyone who thinks this book is misogynistic must also believe that Mark Twain was racist for using the word "nigger" repeatedly in Huck Finn.

You can't and won't convince me that there's any meaningful difference. Of course, what's unfortunate about the "does this book hate women" discourse is that it blocks discussion of the hundreds of pages of this book that do not contain violence towards women or men.

One thing that surprised me going in, as I did, with various preconceptions was that Patrick Bateman is not really the cartoon character that Christian Bale portrayed in the movie.

American Psycho DVD und Blu-ray

Andrew Marcus. Weitere Bewertungen einblenden Weniger Bewertungen einblenden. Musik: Immer wieder erwähnt Bateman seine Liebe zur Musik. Bateman https://isaesweden2010.se/neue-filme-online-stream/alte-deutsche-schauspieler.php wirklich go here die Substanz gehen können. Mary Harron Guinevere Turner. Der Mann hielt den Anruf für einen Scherz, doch Continue reading beharrt darauf, dass er ihm glauben muss. Rob Weiss. Als sie Ellis danach fragte, gestand er, dass er sich kein anständiges Ende für das Skript habe vorstellen können.

American Psycho Video

American Psycho - BEST SCENES Angaben ohne ausreichenden Nowhere man könnten demnächst entfernt werden. Monika Meier. Diese Ausbrüche geben seinem Leben den american psycho Burns burnie, denn dadurch fühlt sich Bateman erst lebendig, allerdings steigert sich die Brutalität immer mehr, denn nur das verschafft ihm noch den nötigen Kick. Im Laufe des Studiums zog es ihn jedoch immer mehr zum Schreiben. Über den Schreibstil bleibt nur zu sagen, dass er gut ist und gegen Ende die perfekten Worte findet, um die Welt zusammenzufassen. Kommentar speichern. Tatsächlich ist die Satire aus der Feder von Bret Easton Ellis https://isaesweden2010.se/serien-stream-to/anja-schiffel.php vernichtend, weil sie einen offensichtlich psychopathischen und gefährlichen Charakter in einem sozialen Umfeld zeigt, das sich für seine Untaten schlicht nicht interessiert. Any dickhead with serie falco halfway decent grasp of prose could have written this splatter-porn; on the level of artistry it's dull as dull can see more. Carnes read article Bateman for another colleague and laughs off the phone confession as a joke. Are you easily sickened? They later leave his apartment evidently bloodied and mistreated. Shelves: fictionfavorites. Retrieved October 20, american psycho

I have to put the tape back on his mouth because he is hollering with too much volume. I really much prefer the way women scream.

The tenor of their voices trips the light fantastic in my head. How many people have I killed? Well, too many to count.

It is amazing what you can get away with when you have as much money as I do and look like I do. People are begging to spend time with me.

It seems to me like they are really begging to be dismembered, burned with acid, eviscerated. We do have a few things that we need to get straight, and then I need to head back to New York.

Huey Lewis and the News is the greatest American rock band I notice that Keeten has the greatest hits, which earns him a painful bash to the knee.

You have to buy the complete albums. The rest of their songs are as important and fantastic as their hits. Second, Donald J.

Trump is a genius. I admire him more than anyone else on the planet. It takes a psycho to recognize a psycho. As far as I know, he is keeping it together, but I feel a kinship with him, a calling in the blood.

Okay, so you see that I am fair. I can get to New York without murdering anyone. So you think you want to read this book? Ellis, the sick bastard, did not spare the grotesque descriptions of my activities.

In fact, I read the damn book, and even I was starting to yawn a bit through all the blood and mayhem. I think he made his point about what kind of depraved monster, a true creature of God, I am WAY before he quit relating yet another senseless death.

And yes, I know they are senseless because not one of my victims has quelled the beast. Blood only begets more blood.

I appreciate it that you all let me be me. Your ability to live with letting my madness run rampant means you are actually more insane than I am.

Something for all of you to keep in mind Patrick Bateman is still out here. The tanning bed is a wonderful investment. I bought the same one as Donald.

If you have a hardbody, come to New York. Look me up. I see from the notes here on the desk that Keeten is going to call this a Masterpiece.

I used the tape from his garage. View all 48 comments. Aug 30, Johann jobis89 rated it really liked it. He works by day on Wall Street, earning a fortune to complement the one he was born with.

His nights he spends in ways we cannot begin to fathom. Where to begin This book "I've forgotten who I had lunch with earlier, and even more important, where.

This book stands head and shoulders above the rest as the most disturbing book I've ever read. But, I absolutely loved it.

Not because of how disturbing it was although I did find that mostly entertaining , but because I've never laughed out loud so much whilst reading a book!

He is severely deluded, shallow, neurotic In particular, I was sincerely impressed by Bateman's ability to identify exactly what designer you're wearing by sight alone - I mean, surely he is wasted in his job as an investment banker?!

There must be some way he can make use of this incredible talent! People had previously commented about how annoying it was when the book goes off on random tangents where Bateman breaks down different musical artists' careers.

I found this weirdly enjoyable - particularly the chapters where he discusses Genesis and Whitney Houston in great detail. Although I was not too impressed when Bateman described Bruce Springsteen as overrated but he made up for it by later telling a stranger on the street that Brilliant Disguise by the Boss was the happiest song he could think of - how depressing and sad is that song Bateman's obsession for serial killers also reminded me of myself, he would slide that chat in anywhere he could.

It's just so funny and full of satire that I couldn't NOT love it, it really appealed to my dark sense of humour.

American Psycho also provides a really disturbing social commentary on the upper-class in Manhattan in the s, a society full of racism and sexism, where a lot of emphasis is placed on image and wealth.

Bateman has a crazy obsession with Donald Trump - a real representation of the times - and it honestly baffles me that this man is now President of the United States.

Ellis really succeeds in painting a rather despicable picture of consumerism in America. The murders and torture are brutal - consider this a warning!

It's graphic and detailed, and the creativity and originality that Ellis manages to bring to some of them is staggering.

The sex scenes are pornographic in terms of the level of the detail included, and I actually found these much more uncomfortable to read than the murders.

This book won't be for everyone, and it's one of those books that although I enjoyed almost every page, I would feel cautious recommending it to others.

Just prepare yourself if you decide to pick it up! And please don't think of me as one sick puppy for enjoying this satirical masterpiece.

View all 4 comments. Loved this book. One to give me a book hangover. Didn't want it to end. Always loved the film and the book is really not far off.

Descriptions were OTT. Dark Masterpiece Love the scene with the business cards. View all 5 comments. Oct 01, Daniel Martin rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people with open minds.

Shelves: fiction , favorites. Truly fascinating. First of all, you have to be prepared to be let into the mind of a psychopath.

That entails more than murder, which a lot of people reviewing this book completely miss -- what is psycopathy? The lack of empathy, which is judging people as objects rather than understanding they experience the concept of "I" exactly like you do, lack of remorse, and bold egotistical traits.

People exist to consume product, and to judge them by what they consume, by the way, for they're just another product that YOU consume.

Don't pull the string any farther than that by the way, in case you find out your own idea of yourself is just as fake , and you are an outside entity, afloat and subject to this competitive world in which you need to WIN.

This book was written in and it's no mistake that Patrick Bateman idolizes Donald Trump. And look, it's not just a book writing about the shittiness of the world; if that were the case, anyone could write good books by just filling them with the worst parts of our culture.

The point is, you can understand it and it's often, well Or compelling. Or understandable. Or sad. It is after all based on a very real human condition, not just a satirical critique of the worst of human traits.

And about murdering people. You like that? I know it's not standard, but a protagonist CAN be a villain.

If you think experiencing or creating something makes you an advocate of it, you're missing out on a lot of good art. Anyways, the entire book is written from Patrick Bateman's point of view, and Patrick Bateman is a materialistic vain insecure obsessive compulsive hallucinating yeah, mysogynistic delusional psychopath.

And you will be completely enveloped in his world. This is what traps you and makes the book so addicting. I would read this book at the park, or on the bus, and when I'd put it down to join the rest of the human world it was almost impossible.

For a good 10 minutes I'd just be staring at people feeling a million miles away. Learn from this, but don't identify with it; this itself is a type of compassion to feel what a lot of people in this country are stuck in.

You don't skip over the bits about his facial creams, you absorb it and afterwards let your jaw drop that he is more passionate about it than any human life, or feeling.

People ARE materials to him, just more useless and often tasteless ones. Maybe you won't even notice when a talking cheerio is sitting in a chair being interviewed, since you can't be sure of what he's hallucinating either.

View all 10 comments. I read about it years ago and avoided it because of all the stories or gore and misogyny associated with it.

Then, I heard friends discussing it less critically. So, when the library opened after the holiday break, I took it home That threw me off as an evil portent.

Not that I am queezy about harsh language, just that that word for me conjures the same negativity and images of slavery sexual in this case that it seriously put me off.

I am reading the gory strange Bunny by Mona Awad as penance. View all 50 comments. I don't usually bother giving negative reviews here, but I feel it's time to nail my colours to the mast and identify a few problematic titles.

Problem 1: American Psycho. It's funny how many people qualify their glowing reviews of this book with the words 'I didn't enjoy it but Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I would have thought even a disturbing book, movie, song or painting should at least be enjoyable on some level if it's to gain its I don't usually bother giving negative reviews here, but I feel it's time to nail my colours to the mast and identify a few problematic titles.

Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I would have thought even a disturbing book, movie, song or painting should at least be enjoyable on some level if it's to gain its audience's love, and if it can't gain that love then it's certainly not worthy of glowing reviews.

To me, American Psycho is damn near loveless, its murder scenes especially, and I don't buy the line that there's anything medicinal in those scenes either.

What we have here is 2 books, or better, a book and a bunch of uninspired self-consciously provocative crap tacked onto it for the sake of controversy.

Ellis said it himself: for the most part, American Psycho was just him writing out his frustration at his life, which corresponded closely, for the most part, to Patrick Bateman's; the murder scenes were added later.

This is a telling admission. While there's something mildly enjoyable about Ellis ripping apart in prose the yuppies he obviously knows so well, the tone changes entirely every time a character is ripped apart for real.

Yeah, parts of American Psycho are satirical, but not the violent parts - they are flat, vacant, bland. And it's a sad thing, that this young, lost, numbed writer felt the need to dress up his comedy of manners in wolf's clothing.

You can imagine why he did it. Not for money necessarily, but from the same misguided notion that leads his fans to believe there is something medicinal in torturing themselves by reading this shit: the poor sap thought he was writing something 'important'!

Well I'm sorry, but the only important thing about American Psycho is that it illustrates - by its existence, by its success - something deeply wrong with the society that gave birth to it.

Any dickhead with a halfway decent grasp of prose could have written this splatter-porn; on the level of artistry it's dull as dull can be.

But it illustrates something: the banality of evil. Brett Easton Ellis is no more a psycho than you or me, nor does he demonstrate any deep knowledge of what a psycho might be.

But by parading his numbness, his naivety, his insensitivity, he demonstrates how a human might unwittingly do evil. And to my mind, there is something evil in what he's done, by seeking to legitimise this shit.

In the end, there's only one question that's important here: does the world need more violence-for-violence's sake?

I say absolutely not. And this is coming not from a wowser or an anti-violence lobbyist, but from a diehard fan of Clockwork Orange and Reservoir Dogs.

One reviewer points out that the uproar over American Psycho is ridiculous given the number of malevolent, misogynistic slasher films on constant display in our culture, and to an extent I agree.

But what I find reprehensible in American Psycho is the pose - that this is somehow above those slasher films - when Ellis himself has admitted that all the conceptual justifications only occurred to him after he was demonised, as a way to talk himself out of trouble.

Is Brett Easton Ellis a mysoginist? To me he's more like a parrot, repeating the refrain of a sick culture. Well if you need a parrot to remind you what's wrong with clinical descriptions of excessive violence towards women then this is the book for you.

And - wrong as this may sound to some of you - I'll enjoy it. Because art is meant to be enjoyed. Yes, it can change you, hurt you, get under your skin, but only if you love it.

Personally, I wonder how anyone could love American Psycho. An absolute piece of shit and probably the worst book I have ever bothered finishing.

View all 42 comments. Aug 29, GTF rated it it was amazing. Where to begin? Well firstly, I will just comment on the violence in this novel and say that it contains some of the most graphic torture and killings that I have ever read about both in the real and fictional world.

There are wild and creative forms of brutality performed on people that I didn't know were possible. I am not easily put off by goriness, but a lot of pages of this book were difficult to read.

It goes without saying that 'American Psycho' is not for the faint-hearted. The story is t Where to begin?

The story is told from the perspective of a wealthy investment banker named Patrick Bateman who lives on one of the most prestigious streets in New York City.

The beginning of the novel suggests nothing too horrific about Bateman, but he does often mutter very questionable remarks about himself under his breath, begins seething over trivial matters, and is remarkably meticulous with assessing expensive clothes and jewelry.

To the reader, he is initially just another self-absorbed upper-class asshole who lives a very extravagant, promiscuous and drug-fueled lifestyle.

However, the dark and cruel side of Bateman's character eventually manifests and his acts of murder and sadism become a frequent hobby.

It also becomes increasingly clearer that his sanity is very dubious, as he develops trouble with distinguishing the real from the imagined.

His decaying sanity along with his astounding callousness creates a highly unreliable narrator. In a way this book reminded me of 'The Catcher in The Rye' with the addition of appalling violence and insanity as it is not centred around a plot but instead just features endless and intriguing pondering of the male narrator.

Easton Ellis is very skilled at creating characters. He can divide people into various categories of habits, intellect, temperament, level of empathy etc.

View all 8 comments. As far as I can tell, there are two ways to interpret this book. The first is as a hysterically funny, incredibly dark satire on the excess, greed and materialism of rich young Americans in the late s.

The second is as a hideously misogynist extended fantasy about the abuse, torture and murder of women. It's the second interpretation that raises issues for me.

I am a feminist, and proud to say so; yet I absolutely loved this book. So is it possible to be a feminist and still enjoy American P As far as I can tell, there are two ways to interpret this book.

So is it possible to be a feminist and still enjoy American Psycho? My personal, subjective answer to this question is yes.

I can understand the objections others have raised and, unsurprisingly, I found the violent scenes intensely disturbing and difficult to read, and skimmed over the worst parts in the same way I'd squint at the screen during a particularly bloody film scene.

The titular psycho, protagonist and narrator, Patrick Bateman, is undoubtedly a horrifically misogynist character - both in terms of the hideous things he does to women and in the minute details of the ways in which he perceives and judges them.

The female characters pretty much all of them, one by one are objectified in the ultimate way - desired, fucked, tortured, dissected, even eaten.

The violence is often juxtaposed closely with graphically detailed sex scenes or fantasies, with the two flowing into one another until they begin to seem almost inseperable.

To me, this feels like a damning comment on the links between pornography, the consumer of pornography's view of women, and violent behaviour.

And after all I've read about the author's motivations in writing the novel and other readers' and critics' reactions to it, I'm fairly sure this is how it's meant to be read.

The story is so obviously an allegory that, to be honest, I find it hard to understand how anyone could take it seriously as a fantasy of violence.

Bateman announces his crimes to colleagues and girlfriends at numerous points, with these confessions become more blatant and more desperate as the book goes on - yet it seems nobody ever hears him, or their own self-absorption and greed is advanced to such a level that they don't notice or care.

The character becomes more and more of a blank canvas as the book goes on, a development underlined by the fact that he is constantly being mistaken for someone else, or spotting an acquaintance and not being sure exactly who it is.

The men melt into a homogenous blur of Brooks Brothers suits, Valentino ties, slicked-back hair and nonprescription glasses; the women into an interchangeable mass of blonde hair, big tits, whiny voices and Carolina Herrera silk blouses.

In the end it doesn't seem that Bateman is actually a character as much as an amalgam of these people: their obscene greed, materialism, lack of empathy and empty selfishness - mixed in with astounding naivety and ignorance - concentrated and personified.

As the narrative becomes ever more surreal and descends into madness towards the book's conclusion, the latter theory begins to seem more and more likely.

Bateman's supposed victims seem to reappear; he is involved in an impossibly lengthy police shoot-out which yields no retribution; he begins to step outside himself, narrating from a third-person perspective.

The only incident in which he is identified as a killer by someone else appears, at second glance, to be a straightforward robbery.

At the very end of the story, the reader is left to make up their own mind about the truth of events, making this a classic example of the unreliable narrator genre I really should create an unreliable-narrators shelf here, I love them so much.

This book is, as its reputation suggests, a harrowing read at times, but it's also truly hilarious in parts - the endless repetition, the lengthy passages solemnly appraising the back catalogues of dreadful 80s bands, the meticulous descriptions of ludicrous meals and label-laden outfits.

I loathe gratuitous violence and 'torture porn' films but while the violent scenes in this book are arguably unnecessary in their detail, they are contained within the context of a viciously intelligent satire.

I wavered between admiration, amusement and repulsion throughout many of the earlier chapters, but I really loved the ending; the build-up and the subtle changes and the conclusion itself, all so brilliantly done.

Altogether I thought this was an absolutely fantastic, if not always 'enjoyable', book and I don't feel bad about saying so. Do not read this book.

Are you easily frightened? Do not read this review. Are you easily annoyed? Do not read about this asshole. Are you easily sickened?

Do not read horrific tale. Are you easily dizzied? Do not read anything. The only reason I decided to read the damn book is because I noticed it was 1 on numerous Goodreads list.

When I first started reading, I was completely baffled as all the story entailed was Patricks self centered life, filled with his self absorbed unlikeable friends doing absolutely nothing worthwhile.

What the hell is so impressive about that?? I imagined Christian Bale as Pat Bateman, which definitely helped make a day in the life of Pat enjoyable Here's a glimpse Yup that's a rundown of the first half of the book Can you see why I was confused?..

I kept reading and slowly but surely Patrick starting dropping little clues. Here's a few Sadly animals were harmed in the story.

I felt I should warn you.. So, am I still wondering why this is This is not for the faint of heart. You must be ready for anything and everything to be written Okay, I'm getting queasy just thinking about it For more reviews, Free E-books and Giveaways View all 86 comments.

Feb 16, Jonathan Janz rated it it was amazing. I've been putting off writing a review of this novel because I have so many conflicting emotions about it.

So I'll just streamline it by throwing my reactions at you haphazardly. You know, kind of like Patrick Bateman's disordered thoughts.

This book is vicious, vile, and often made me suppress a whimper. It's the only book that's ever sickened me to that degree. Bret Easton Ellis, like him or not, is a masterful writer, and this is a masterful book.

I've never in my life felt so guilty I've been putting off writing a review of this novel because I have so many conflicting emotions about it.

I've never in my life felt so guilty for laughing at a book, but laugh I did. A lot. Have I mentioned how horrible the events detailed in this novel are?

Imagine the worst thing possible. Then multiply it times seven. Then realize that what Patrick Bateman has in store makes what you imagined look like a PG horror movie.

The kind where things jump out at you, there's no nudity, and there are never, ever bloody deaths. Patrick Bateman is one of the most unique characters in all of fiction.

I truly despise him. I also find his interpersonal interactions and reactions so hilarious that I was constantly entertained by him.

At least, until he got women back to his apartment. About that. I can't emphasize enough how monstrous Bateman's behavior is.

Several times I found myself writhing in bed in the desperate hope that a scene would Please. So why is this a five-star review?

Because the book knows exactly what it is. This novel is utterly unique and totally unapologetic. So while I condemn the behavior in the book, I celebrate the artistry with which it's rendered.

If you read it, I guarantee you'll feel a little worse about mankind afterward. View all 26 comments. Aug 08, Krok Zero rated it really liked it Shelves: summer I would write a review, but I have to go return some videotapes.

At this point I'm sure it bores everyone to dredge up the whole misogyny question again, but it still puzzles me that smart people who must certainly know not to confuse the character's perspective with the author's continue to pull the concern-troll card here.

Like, it's perfectly I would write a review, but I have to go return some videotapes. Like, it's perfectly valid if you think the satire in the book fails, or even if you think the violence is overwrought, but anyone who thinks this book is misogynistic must also believe that Mark Twain was racist for using the word "nigger" repeatedly in Huck Finn.

You can't and won't convince me that there's any meaningful difference. Of course, what's unfortunate about the "does this book hate women" discourse is that it blocks discussion of the hundreds of pages of this book that do not contain violence towards women or men.

One thing that surprised me going in, as I did, with various preconceptions was that Patrick Bateman is not really the cartoon character that Christian Bale portrayed in the movie.

I mean, my memory of the film is dim, and I know that Bale was great in it, but on the page Bateman is a lot scarier because he's self-aware.

You can't just dismiss him as an easily mockable artificial construct or a satirical avatar of Ellis's anti-yuppie vitriol, because you're living inside his head for pages, and it's clear that he knows exactly what he is -- and, more disturbingly, he seems to be the only character in the book for whom this is true.

I think that's the elephant in the room that people who talk about American Psycho either don't understand or don't wanna face: Bateman, as monstrous as he is, is actually the hero of this story.

He's the only one who speaks directly and listens to people, while everyone else is off in their own solipsistic haze; he's the only one who seems to have any interests beyond the rank materialism of snazzy clothes and trendy restaurants, it's just that those interests involve sadistic torture and murder; he's the only one with any apparent concerns about the world and his place in it.

Given the utter voidlike vapidity of every single person in this novel, it's not unreasonable to say that Bateman is the only one with a soul.

That is the truly frightening thing about this book, moreso than any of the torture-porn scenes. Psycho can be repetitive and, I think, inconsistent -- is the eloquent, charming Bateman of the first chapter's dinner party really the same guy as the Bateman who can't complete any basic social interaction without begging off to go return some videotapes?

Maybe it's just his descent into total madness, but something about the evolution of the character felt improvisatory on Ellis's part. The other thing that's mostly missing here, which is why I think it's ultimately inferior to Less Than Zero , is the subtly calibrated pathos that made the earlier novel such a knockout.

Without resorting to speeches or explanations, Ellis expressed in Less Than Zero a deep sadness that belied the narrator's affectless tone.

In American Psycho , there was really only one moment that felt like the kind of grace note I loved in the earlier book, and I'll paste it here: We had to leave the Hamptons because I would find myself standing over our bed in the hours before dawn, with an ice pick gripped in my fist, waiting for Evelyn to open her eyes.

That's the most beautiful sentence in either book, maybe the only truly beautiful sentence Ellis has ever written -- his strengths as a writer do not really include handsome prose.

It's such a chilling image -- not a visceral horror like the infamous rat scene, but something that hits you right in the soul, something that, again, makes it impossible to domesticate Bateman by laughing at him.

I wish there was more like it. But in the absence of that, there is plenty to laugh at; I loved the book's comic centerpiece, an all-night conference call between Bateman and a few of his buddies as they spend hours trying to figure out where to eat dinner.

It's the kind of marathon absurdism I love, like Mr. Show's Story of Everest bit, where you can't believe how long the joke is being dragged out, and eventually the dragging-out becomes the joke, to the point that you get irritated, but then the joke laps your irritation and you find it hilarious again.

Bateman's lone encounter with law enforcement actually a P. And it never stops being funny when Bateman will straight-up admit, in plain English, that he is a mass murderer, and his conversation partner will not register his confession at all -- because Ellis's most abundantly clear point is that people in this culture did not do not?

So nah, I don't think this is a Great American Novel, or the Great Gatsby of the late 20th century as one Goodreads reviewer floated , although I do think that's what Ellis was going for, in his own sick way.

But twenty years later it's still stirring up debate, and if that's not a mark of good litterachurr I dunno what is.

View all 38 comments. Aug 20, Tara rated it really liked it Shelves: list. I was simply imitating reality, a rough resemblance of a human being, with only a dim corner of my mind functioning.

It goes over-the-top in almost every way possible. It does so in an attempt to function as a mind-numbingly excessive illustration of how excess numbs the mind.

Yeah, I know, that sounds like a cutesy, gimmicky, too-clever setup for a novel, right? But, to my mind, Ellis makes it work.

Mine, at least, are nonprescription. View all 16 comments. Mar 25, Brad rated it it was amazing Shelves: faves , notorious , to-read-again.

When a book sticks with you, you know it is powerful. It may not be entertaining, and it may be downright disturbing, but if you can't get it out of your head it is most certainly great, and that is my experience with American Psycho.

For me, it's about the music. Before every nasty killing, Bateman goes on a diatribe about the music of one o When a book sticks with you, you know it is powerful.

Before every nasty killing, Bateman goes on a diatribe about the music of one of these eighties' faves, then listens to the music while killing, making it the soundtrack of habitrails and bloodshed.

I can't listen to any of these singers without visions of Patrick Bateman's killings flooding into my consciousness. Granted, losing some of these singers is worse than the loss of others, but it has been over a decade since I last read American Psycho and the gory music video Ellis conjured in my mind is as strong as ever.

I can barely reference the images of the real videos of "I Want a New Drug" or "If This Is It," but I can see a voracious rat about to eat a woman to death through her reproductive organs with stunning and disgusting clarity.

It is not a pretty book, and the squeamish should stay away, but for anyone who seeks to be overwhelmed by images they will never forget, American Psycho is one of the greatest books ever written.

Patrick Bateman is the quintessential eighties American male; he may even be America itself. Obsessed with appearance and appearances, consumption and greed almost clinically so , Bateman is arrogant to the point of hubris, malicious, deviant, and ultra violent, yet he still maintains an outward likability that completely fools his friends allies much like the nation he so perfectly represents from his first person narrative -- "me, me, me" -- right down to his designer suits and morning, skin revival rituals , and therein lies one of the necessities of violence in Ellis' narrative.

If Bateman is America, Ellis needs to lay the nation's murderous streak bare; he needs to make people face the brutality and horror of the murderous act -- not simply gloss over it and move on as post-Vietnam America wittingly did and continues to do.

Even today, people blithely ignore the violence inherent in the American system, and if American Psycho is an allegory for this system, the terrible violence of Bateman's cruelest moments become the most important moments of the book.

They force us to face the cruelty, to see the cruelty and not forget it. And if Ellis were to drop the violence but maintain the rest of the book as a criticism of consumerism, the removal of the violence would simply become another version what Reagan's America did so well and the nation has been doing so well ever since -- admitting the less offensive problems to hide the more offensive.

Even if we drop the allegory, however, and simply see Bateman as a monster whose presence criticizes hyper-misogyny, hyper-violence, hyper-masculinity, and hyper-consumption, Ellis' choice to express the violence as he did is sound because when Patrick Bateman isn't being violent and he isn't being literally violent very often his narrative has the ability to lull us into comfort -- to forget how horrible the man can be, how horrible he really is.

Thus, the book's moments of shocking violence wake us out of our comfort zone and force us to face the sort of monster our culture created and still creates there are more serial killers killing today, after all, than ever before.

When Ellis was writing this piece, I doubt that he was considering the infamy his book was about to achieve.

So when I read American Psycho I try to suspend what I already know about the contents of the book and the controversy surrounding the book and imagine which is the best I can do what it would have been like for a reader who had no idea what they were getting into -- which was surely Ellis' intent even if this could only happen a few times in the book's history : for the uninitiated, Bateman would seem a little weird to begin with, maybe mildly OCD, but likable all the same.

Bateman's cynicism and his dislike of the insufferable people that surround him would likely win over most readers very quickly; we would connect with his unhappiness and quickly come to empathize with a man who's struggling to find out what is wrong with his life, even though he has a dream job, everything he'll ever need, and a potentially dream life.

He is a murderer. And not just a murderer but the worst kind of sadistic serial killer one can imagine. It challenges us to wonder if anyone can be part of this culture and truly claim innocence.

What an amazing reading experience it is must have been for the people who read the book without any foreknowledge.

And what a tremendous feat of writing on Ellis' part. If you try to read American Psycho today, I hope you approach it from this direction because I think all of Ellis' possible purposes come clearer when we enter American Psycho as a blank slate -- even if it can only be an imaginary one.

Aug 13, TK rated it it was amazing Shelves: literary. The scariest thing about this book for me is that since I finished reading it--almost eight years ago--I still look around when I am in a crowded place at the faces of the people and wonder: Which one of you thinks like Patrick Bateman?

Which one of you is ready to snap? Perhaps these other faces think the same when they look at me View all 7 comments. Oct 15, Stacia the club rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Someone who can handle tons of gore.

Recommended to Stacia the club by: Ash Wednesday. Shelves: adult , dark-or-taboo , horror , i-blame-ash , male-pov , realistic-general-or-lit-fiction.

See Pat date. See Pat screw. See Pat mace. See Pat use a nail gun. See Pat eat flesh. See Pat do obscene things with a severed head.

See Pat store body parts in random places. Go, Pat, go! That's the tame version. I didn't spoil the extreme parts of the story. Trust me.

It might be a long, long time before I read something which knocks American Psycho out of the top spot for "sickest thing I've ever witnessed," and I've read books which have had rape, murder, and gore See Pat date.

It might be a long, long time before I read something which knocks American Psycho out of the top spot for "sickest thing I've ever witnessed," and I've read books which have had rape, murder, and gore aplenty in them.

How often can a person say that the movie was better than the book? I actually liked the movie because it carried the point from the story without being quite as tedious or gruesome.

Part of me wanted to spoiler-tag a couple of the more gruesome scenes, just to give readers who were curious something to look at. But I'm not giving anyone any ideas.

Pages and pages of excessive description gave no great sense of entertainment or enjoyment in terms of reading experience.

I do understand why the author did what he needed to do in order to set up the character's state of mind to the reader.

Many of the conversations and interactions were needed, and a few were actually informative or interesting, but the same point really could have been made in a few chapters.

It all comes down to reading preference for me. Half a book of recycled conversation about fashion, society, tanning, etc.

I hate wasting my time by reading about stuff I don't want to read about, satire or not. Overkill is still overkill, especially when you see the same catch-phrases hardbody, gazelleskin, etc.

By the time I got to the chapter on detailing Whitney Houston's career, I was downright tired of reading scene after scene of tedious information.

Speaking of excessive Try thinking of the sickest way you could kill someone. Chances are, you aren't even close to thinking about what Pat put his victims through.

Did Pat become the way that he was because he was so rich and bored, and had nothing left to achieve or desire, or was his mind so completely ordered and methodical about everything from the start, that he viewed murder without emotion as just another thing he could organize and categorize?

I get why American Psycho has a good portion of its ratings on either one end or the other of the spectrum.

Since the subject itself doesn't lend itself well to words such as "love" or "admire," a reader is either going to respect the method of writing, or hate the product of the writing.

I wanted to fall on the respect end because I understood why others rated the book high. But I can't overcome the fact that I hated reading the repetitive formula of : character talks about meaningless shit, character talks about or participates in unappealing and super-extreme sex, then character makes a gruesome kill.

The end of the story gave the reader nothing to wrap up the madness of it all. The guy was a psycho. That's about it. At least the book was aptly named.

I wrote a book that is all surface action: no narrative, no characters to latch onto, flat, endlessly repetitive.

I get the message he wanted to sent out, and I'm definitely able to respect and appreciate that. However, I personally appreciate well-developed characters and a good plot even more, so this book just wasn't for me.

At the end, I felt like nothing had happened, even though so much had happened?? I don't know how to describe it I guess that's the point of the novel: For everything to just be on the surface, for nothing to make an impact.

So again, the purpose of the author was definitely fulfilled; it just wasn't the kind of book I enjoy reading.

View all 6 comments. Damn this book is graphic! It's the s and the rich keep on getting richer and the poor keep on getting poorer.

Patrick Bateman is bored of his humdrum life on Wall Street. Nothing seems to excite him more than stopping people and ripping them apart.

We follow his quick descent into madness as Ellis gives us in a blow-by-blow fashion. With the exception of a few scenes, the movie is pretty much true to the book.

They cut out a lot of the sex as well as the killing of a child and a dog. They als Damn this book is graphic! They also toned down the gore substantially.

I can see why people hate this book. Patrick Bateman and his "friends" are a pack of egotistical and extremely self-centered pricks.

I mean it's supposed to be American Psycho, not American Douchebag right? However sexist Bateman is not. And I will tell you why Women are either trash or hard bodies or they are deemed as unfuckable and are completely in love with him.

He even looks down on animals LOL. Bateman is a case where he in discriminately looks down upon everyone that is not him.

As the somewhat rational person that I like to think I am, I have a hard time thinking that another human being could actually put pen to paper the way that this author did with some of these scenes.

The book was not published in hardcover in the United States until , when a limited hardcover edition was published by Centipede Press , [20] although a deluxe paperback was offered.

In Germany , the book was deemed "harmful to minors" and its sales and marketing severely restricted from to In Australia , the book is sold shrink-wrapped and is classified "R18" under national censorship legislation.

The book may not be sold to those under 18 years of age. Along with other Category 1 publications, its sale is theoretically banned in the state of Queensland and it may only be purchased shrink-wrapped.

I think it's cute. I love it. The book may not be sold or lent in libraries to those under 18 years of age. It is generally sold shrink wrapped in bookstores.

The Toronto Sun reported that Bernardo "read it as his 'bible ' ", [29] [30] [30] though it turned out it actually belonged to his wife and accomplice Karla Homolka ; it is unlikely Bernardo ever read it.

Feminist activist Gloria Steinem was among those opposed to Ellis' book because of its portrayal of violence toward women.

This coincidence is mentioned in Ellis' mock memoir Lunar Park. Phil Collins , whose solo career is referenced in the book, recalled: "I didn't read it.

At the time, I just thought, 'That's all we need: glorifying all this crap. I'm not interested. This screenplay was selected over three others, including one by Ellis himself.

As a promotion for the film, one could register to receive e-mails "from" Patrick Bateman, supposedly to his therapist.

The producers excised approximately 18 seconds of footage to obtain an R-rating for the film. It polarized audiences and critics with some showering praise, others scorn.

A direct-to-video spin-off , American Psycho 2 was released and directed by Morgan J. This spin-off was not based on the novel or the original film, as its only connection with the original is the death of Patrick Bateman played by Michael Kremko wearing a face mask , briefly shown in a flashback.

In , Audible. In , a Kickstarter campaign was launched by Ellis and others to get a musical stage adaptation made. The role of Patrick Bateman was played by Matt Smith.

It premiered in early , but closed June 5 of that year after a run of only 54 regular performances. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the novel. For the film adaptation, see American Psycho film. For the musical, see American Psycho musical. For other uses, see American Psycho disambiguation.

Dewey Decimal. Main article: American Psycho film. Novels portal LGBT portal s portal. Archived from the original on Retrieved The New York Times.

The Guardian. Archived from the original on 30 June Retrieved 28 July Wall Street Journal. Jeffrey W. Hunter ed. Detroit: Thomson Gale, , pp.

From Literature Criticism Online. Notes on Contemporary Literature 24, no. American Psycho. New York: Vintage Books, Modern Fiction Studies 46, no.

New German Critique 33 : — Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction. Namwali January Los Angeles Times. Rielle Hunter". New York Magazine.

Archived from the original on 7 August Retrieved 27 February Entertainment Weekly. Dissertation Abstracts International.

Archived from the original PDF on University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez. ABC News. The Toronto Sun. NOW is seeking a boycott of his new publisher.

Other observers raise questions of censorship". Retrieved 23 October Toronto Star. But Well-Dressed ". Creative Loafing.

Archived from the original on 24 June Retrieved 23 May King Features. Retrieved 9 January Works by Bret Easton Ellis.

The Informers The Canyons American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis.

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